Ace:
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Nothing is written when it comes to dementia. What we can think of as a pathology of older people sometimes is not, and many young people and their families must accept that Alzheimer's or another dementia has entered their lives.

Faced with this situation, it is normal for the people who are affected and their families to be uninformed. For this reason, Ace Alzheimer Center Barcelona offers the children of people with early-onset dementia a series of sessions to help address this diagnosis and receive support from professionals who for more than 30 years have been caring for people with Alzheimer's or other dementias.

There are 10 sessions that are held online Thursday afternoons, aimed at children of people diagnosed with early-onset dementia, that is, before the age of 65. The meetings are led by a psychologist and a social worker and aim to clarify doubts about the dementia process, care for the family member, as well as offer support to family members.

If you want more information or to register in the socio-educational group for children or couples of people with early-onset dementia, contact Silvia Preckler at the email spreckler@fundacioace.org or by phone at 93 430 47 20.

Alzheimer's has no age

At Ace Alzheimer Center Barcelona we work to sensitize and raise awareness in society that, despite the belief that Alzheimer's is a disease of the elderly, on many occasions it is not.

More and more frequently we find people of middle age, and even professionally active and with family responsibilities, who are diagnosed with dementia.

Given this, the solution is an early detection of cognitive deterioration that allows us to delay the onset of Alzheimer's. To do this, enter our Facememory® test to find out your cognitive performance or, if you are over 50 years old, check your memory for free with Ace Alzheimer Center Barcelona.

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